I distrust a man that says when. If he’s got to be careful not to drink too much it’s because he’s not to be trusted when he does.
Dashiell Hammett, The Maltese Falcon (via vintagecrimeblacklizard)
(Reblogged from vintagecrimeblacklizard)

The executive who signs his name by quickly scratching a few illegible lines may make himself feel important. He also makes himself a forger’s delight, warns Paul A. Osborn, who heads a New York firm that specializes in examining questionable documents.

How should he sign? “The hardest kind of signature to forge is one that contains at least two full names and is written rapidly, freely and legibly”, says Mr. Osborn. He adds that the signature should be in normal script, with all the letters connected. A signature with unconnected letters is easier to forge, says Mr. Osborn, because the forger gets a chance to work more slowly, lifting his pen at the breaks while he studies carefully the rest of the letters.

Edward P. Foldessy, “Crime and Business: What You Should Know About the Infiltration of Crime into Business—and of Business into Crime”

Published by Dow Jones Books, 1971

I’m selling an extra copy I have of the collection of Lawrence’s Block’s short stories that was released in 2008 (eBay listing is here).  

I’m selling an extra copy I have of the collection of Lawrence’s Block’s short stories that was released in 2008 (eBay listing is here).  

Charles Willeford (January 2, 1919 - March 27, 1988)

Penguin books is re-releasing 50 classic crime novels to the Australia market.  I was happy to see that Charles Willeford’s Miami Blues made the list but I was shocked that not a single novel from either Jim Thompson or James Cain was included. 
You can check out the full list here.

Penguin books is re-releasing 50 classic crime novels to the Australia market.  I was happy to see that Charles Willeford’s Miami Blues made the list but I was shocked that not a single novel from either Jim Thompson or James Cain was included. 

You can check out the full list here.

Don’t listen to the critics, this movie is well worth seeing.  

The Cocktail Waitress by James M. Cain
Over the weekend I read James M. Cain’s final unfinished novel as published by Hard Case Crime.  It’s a story of a femme fatale who is torn between two men who each have something that she wants: sex and money.  Both men end up dead and the reader is left to decide what actually happened (Is she a murderess or a victim of circumstances?). I enjoyed reading the novel even though the story was a bit uneven.  There were enough good passages to make it a worthwhile read. The story was also much more racy than I had expected,  although I suppose the lurid cover should have clued me in.
The novel is followed by an afterword by the book’s editor, Charles Ardai, whose love for Cain’s writing is apparent.  Ardai describes Cain as one of the three greatest writers in the hardboiled tradition (Chandler and Hammett being the other two). He talks about what sets Cain’s writing apart and how his earlier writings were received by other writers and the general public. The most fascinating part of the afterword is Ardai’s description of bringing the novel to print.  From tracking down the manuscript to piecing together multiple rewrites and fragments, the 9 year publication process reads like a detective story in itself.

The Cocktail Waitress by James M. Cain

Over the weekend I read James M. Cain’s final unfinished novel as published by Hard Case Crime.  It’s a story of a femme fatale who is torn between two men who each have something that she wants: sex and money.  Both men end up dead and the reader is left to decide what actually happened (Is she a murderess or a victim of circumstances?). I enjoyed reading the novel even though the story was a bit uneven.  There were enough good passages to make it a worthwhile read. The story was also much more racy than I had expected,  although I suppose the lurid cover should have clued me in.

The novel is followed by an afterword by the book’s editor, Charles Ardai, whose love for Cain’s writing is apparent.  Ardai describes Cain as one of the three greatest writers in the hardboiled tradition (Chandler and Hammett being the other two). He talks about what sets Cain’s writing apart and how his earlier writings were received by other writers and the general public. The most fascinating part of the afterword is Ardai’s description of bringing the novel to print.  From tracking down the manuscript to piecing together multiple rewrites and fragments, the 9 year publication process reads like a detective story in itself.

I picked up this noir classic last weekend at the Alabaster Bookshop near Union Square.  

I picked up this noir classic last weekend at the Alabaster Bookshop near Union Square.